Eat With Tess! Stay With Tess!

EatWith has truly been one of the most marvelous things that had ever happened to me, and I am so grateful to my guests for letting me do what I love.  I have even been lucky enough to have guests from Cleveland, Cincinnati, Akron, Wheeling and other far-flung spots come to Westerville just to EatWith me!  

Since I’m already an enthusiasticpart of the sharing economy and since I have the room (and since the house hasn’t sold!), I decided why not provide a place for out of town guests to stay?

 So I have! Click here to see it!

Next you eat with me, perhaps you can stay with me, too. 

Bon Appètit and Bon Voyage!

Slow Cooker Beef Bone Stock 

Did you know Julia Child’s very first show featured the classic French stew, Boeuf Bourguignon? It is one of my very favorite episodes and recipes! Watch it here. It’s so great!

Beginning in October, I am adding “Dinner in Burgundy” to my EatWith Fall/Winter offerings, and few dishes suit the season better than Boeuf Bourguignon. 

As with many classic French recipes, good stock is an essential element of Boeuf Bourguignon. Luckily, beef stock is easy to make! You end up with a far superior, healthier product when you make your own, and you will save a lot of money as well. I am going to walk you through the steps. I use a slow cooker (the best invention ever for making stock and a lot of other things!). For stock, I use my 6 qt Hamilton Beach Stay or Go cooker  because the lid clamps down tight so there’s less evaporation. You will find the entire recipe under my Recipes tab, so don’t just follow the steps! Read the recipe! Ask the meat department at your grocery store or your butcher to save marrow bones for you. They are very inexpensive. You can also use oxtail bones. I like to use a combination of the two. 

As always, feel free to ask me questions. 
Enjoy, and bon appétit!

The Steps

  1. Preheat oven to 450°. Line a heavy, rimmed baking sheet with foil.
  2. Place your marrow bones and root vegetables on the sheet. Spray or or lightly brush all with olive oil. VERY IMPORTANT! If you are canning your broth, do not use any oil! Oil can not be canned safely. Simply roast the root vegetables by themselves.
  3. Place sheet in preheated oven and roast for 20 minutes. Shake the sheet and roast for 20 more minutes. When you remove them, the vegetables and bones will be a deep golden brown. Your house will smell  AMAZING!
  4. Place your roasted marrow bones, root vegetables and the remaining ingredients in a 6 qt slow cooker. Fill to the top with water, cover and set on high. After one or two hours, set cooker to low and leave it alone for 24 to 36 hours. No opening the lid! Meat stocks need to cook for much longer than poultry stock. The longer you cook them, the better they will be. A note on bay leaves: there is a difference between domestic California bay leaves (typically available in the United States) and French  bay leaves. The latter is sweeter and more complex. To achieve an authentic flavor in your French recipes, use Mediterranean bay leaves. Often, they come from Turkey. That’s fine. They are still the same type of bay leaves.
  5. Take the crock out of the slow cooker, remove the lid and cool on a heat safe surface for 15 minutes.
  6. Strain the broth through a fine wire mesh sieve like this. If you don’t have one, you can line a regular colander with cheesecloth. If you want SUPER clear broth (I don’t worry about it myself), line a fine mesh sieve with cheesecloth. 
  7. Nest the bowl strained broth in ice and stir frequently until broth is room temperature (about 15 minutes).  The voice of experience, make sure the melting ice doesn’t overflow and flood your counter!
  8. Cover stock and refrigerate for six hours (or longer if it’s more convenient). The fat will solidify on the surface. Remove it with a slotted spoon and discard. While this certainly makes the stock healthier, you can skip this step if you want a richer stock. The fat will reincorporate when the stock is heated. 
  9. Your stock is done! It will keep in the fridge for three days, frozen for three months or canned for one year.  Canning is definitely preferred because it best preserves the flavor. It also saves precious freezer space, AND  you can safely store it for up to one year. In a future post, I will show you how to can stock. It’s safe and easy to can. If I can can, anyone can can!

Bon appetit!


France on my mind…a France craft!

It seems like forever since I was in France. With my only daughter’s nuptials taking place this last July, I was very busy in Ohio! With my departure on August 24 for five weeks in France fast approaching, là belle France has been very much on my mind…so much so that I embarked on a France craft!  Last Saturday, I bought this very unattractive canvas print for $2 at a thrift store.


I spray painted it French blue.


I then went to my Cricut Design Space and laid out my new picture. This is the fun part!


Using my beloved Cricut Explore Air, I cut out the design using Cricut vinyl. If you are new to this, it’s a good idea to cut it out first on card stock as a test run.


I then placed the vinyl on the canvas using Cricut transfer tape. This is the tricky part! Even though a 24″ Cricut mat was sufficient for the project, I still used the Cricut slice feature because doing layers can be tricky! 


And here is the finished print! Not fine art by any means, but cheap and fun. 

A bien tôt!

Moroccan Preserved Lemons….Essential, irreplaceable and so easy to make

Today, I put up a batch of Preserved Lemons for use in my upcoming  EatWith offering “Dinner in Marrakech” (more on that later).

Preserved lemons are essential to Moroccan cuisine. Their exquisite flavor, aroma and silky texture cannot be substituted in a recipe with lemon juice. Trust. Luckily, they are very easy to make. They require a brining period of 30 days, but they will keep for up to one year. Once you start to use them, you will be hooked! I always have some ready to use in my larder. Tonight, they are bringing it in Yogurt Mint Sauce which I’m using as a bed for Moroccan Mini Meatballs. I’m still tweaking the Meatball recipe, but I promise I share will it once I’m satisfied with it!

Learn how to make preserved lemons here.
As always, don’t hesitate to ask me questions.
Bon appetit!
Tess

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Setting the table, à la Française

If you’d like to set an authentic French table, this is an excellent article on how to do so. If you’re planning a trip to France, you can learn what to expect in restaurants and homes. Bon appetit!

From French Country to Paris Chic

French Dinner table

Receiving guests around a dinner table is a a very important part of French culture. Having guests over for a religious occasion, anniversary or other important date requires flawless planning and execution. Every person sitting at the table will become a judge of the affair and any faux pas will necessarily become a subject of gossip for years to come.  This may seem a bit exaggerated (and it is) but I do remember my mom really stressing trying to prepare Easter or Christmas dinners for a dozen family guests. So here are a few dos and don’ts for successfully setting a French table:

Silverware: They should be organized in the order in which they will be used from the outside to the inside.

Forks: Left of the plate, facing down.

Knives: Right of the plate, the cutting side of the blade facing toward the plate.

Dessert spoon…

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French Pickled Garlic

When pickled, garlic retains all the flavor of fresh garlic without the “bite” or oder. This is because the acid in vinegar breaks down the the oder-causing components in garlic. Pickled Garlic has long been a part of French cuisine and is often served as an appetizer. It’s particularly popular in Normandy. I prepared a  batch last night in preparation for my EatWith “Dinner In Normandy” offering which will go live in mid-September. You can find the recipe for French Pickled Garlic here. 

I’m leaving for a month in France tomorrow and will begin my stay with a week and a half at Casa Belle. Gilles, who is both host and chef, has kindly invited me to observe him in the kitchen. Such a treat! Since Pickled Garlic needs to brine for four to five weeks, it will be ready to enjoy when I return in a month….and enjoy it I shall!

Bon appétit!

Tess